Fingering Exercises

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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby RandeDager » Sun Feb 13, 2011 12:08 pm

Thanks, Roger. I'll study this. By the way, I would have used a thumbpick regardless.....lol.

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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby bill_h » Sun Feb 13, 2011 1:47 pm

Interesting thread you've started here Bruce.

If I may suggest, the Maj7th exercise that Craig Dobbins recommended can also be done with the chord configuration turned upside down. It doesn't sound all that hot turned upside down but it does stretch the fingers from a different direction.

When I do that exercise I like to move the chord configurations to the inside set of strings ( 5,4,3, and 2.) That makes it a little more challenging because the strings are bigger and it also requires a little more precision ot play the inside set of strings.

If this particular exercise proves beneficial you may consider a book called "Slur And Reach Development Exercises" by Aaron Shearer. It has the Maj7th exercise in it as well as some other good stuff for the left hand. It's written in standard notation but the exercises are pretty short. I was able to figure them out when I could barely read music and standard notation looked like a bunch of golf clubs stuck to a fence!

If you're looking to build speed and precision in the right hand you may consider "Giuliani's 150 Right Hand Etudes." Don't worry, it was written by Mauro Giuliani back in the 1800's, not Rudy Giuliani! The book contains 150 different arpeggio patterns for the right hand. Each of the exercises is only two measure long and for the left hand they only require you to make a C and G7 chord. That way you can focus e on the right hand without worrying too much about the left. ( It's also in standard notation.)

I don't remember the exact name of the book but google or any good search engine should be able to find it with the right keywords. ( or you may already know about the book from the time you studied "klasskle.")

Hope some of this helps and look forward to seeing what you do with your new chops.

Someone from Guitar Player Magazine ( remember when it was worth reading?) asked the late Tommy Tedesco if he did anything in particular to warm up before a recording session. His reply was he always had a cup of coffee and back before he quit smoking he would always have a smoke too. That just don't work for most of us though!
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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby Roger Hardin » Sun Feb 13, 2011 2:22 pm

Hi Bill

Some of the Giuliani stuff is available on the site below in the link inclucing 120 right hand exercises. These are all tabledit files and you can download a free tabledit viewer.

http://freetabs.org/classical.htm

Also here are the 120 right hand studies in pdf.

http://www.stormthecastle.com/classical_guitar/Collection/120studies-for-right-hand.pdf

Don't worry all of this is public domain I am sure. ;)
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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby keener » Sun Feb 13, 2011 3:48 pm

Fantastic information, Bill and Roger. Thank you both, very much!
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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby RandyBuckner » Sun Feb 13, 2011 4:44 pm

Very cool info Bill & Roger! I'll have to tell my students about the websites. The Carcassi exercises are similar to those Bill and Roger mentioned earlier.

Has anyone else on the board worked out of the George Van Eps series of books?

Great thread we've got going here.

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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby LMark » Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:14 pm

John McClellan gave an outstanding workshop on warming up back in 1999 at CAAS. I think I learned more about the guitar in that one hour than in any other hour I have spent anywhere. Thru that workshop alone, John inspired me to take classical lessons. Perhaps he could be persuaded to give that workshop at CAAS once again in 2011. LMark
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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby Billy Anderson » Mon Feb 14, 2011 6:47 am

Roger, thank you, thank you, thank you!!! U B D 1. Billy
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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby keener » Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:16 pm

The following video shows an excellent guitarist receiving a scolding from Segovia, and then continues with an interview of the (student) guitarist. It seems like a fit for this thread because it emphasizes that one cannot put in minimal effort and expect to get professional results.



I found the video on the old Chet Boards by searching there for the word "efficiency." What I had in mind was finding some examples of Chet's recommendations for efficiency. (I've heard some people on this Board who have said that Chet showed them some tips on efficiency, but I had not seen those people share those tips on this Board, to my knowledge, so I figured I'd search.)

Anyway, I thought some of you would be interested in the video. It's about 10 minutes long, but it was worth the time for me, especially to see such an humble guitarist (despite being very accomplished) and one who really "gets it" (that no good result comes without proper effort).
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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby RandyBuckner » Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:44 pm

I'm having flashbacks of my jazz juries in college... :D
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Re: Fingering Exercises

Postby RandeDager » Wed Feb 16, 2011 9:30 am

Randy, it must be strange to be "surrounded" by so many of us who haven't gone the formal route like you have. However, some of us have still managed to play decently in spite of that. In my case I'd still have to admit that I don't "really" know what I'm doing other than to match sounds to what's in my head. Years of trial and error have made that process become much more efficient. Listening to music with rich harmony such as jazz, and having it played on the piano and other "non-guitar" instruments, has greatly helped to expand that awareness. Having said all of that, I'm one of those "weirdos" who would have been self-disciplined enough to have meticulously follow the steps you went through.

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